I have a nuisance coyote in my neighborhood. What can I do?

Please review this website; do you still consider the coyote a nuisance? Identifing the root of your issue may help resolve the conflict. If you believe a coyote is a direct threat to human safety (bold aggression such as growling, stalking, chasing), it should be reported to local authorities. Because cities vary on their response to coyotes, you may either need to contact your animal control, police department, or local DNR office. They can offer you further advice or respond as needed. Remember that a coyote that is simply present in your neighborhood is not a reason for alarm. Nuisance animals are those that are actually threatening or causing harm to you, your pets, or your property. The presence of coyotes in your yard suggests a food source; as long as it is not artificial, these animals may actually improve the ecological health of your yard by controlling other populations such as rodents and geese. If you are not comfortable with having coyotes nearby, you may have to hire a private trapper to have the animal removed. Be aware, however, that another individual or pack will likely backfill the area after removal of the target animal.

Former research associate Justin Brown, after just catching 434 for collaring

Coyote 434 is a good example of how human behaviors, such as feeding wildlife, can result in coyotes becoming a nuisance. 434 was captured on February 18, 2010, in a marsh surrounded by a subdivision and miles of urbanization. She was a young female, approximately 10 months old, and weighed 13.1 kg. Although this was the peak of the breeding season, she was not in breeding condition. A GPS collar was placed on coyote 434, which means that she was located by satellites on an intensive schedule (at times, this was every 10 minutes, other times every hour).