Bright Lights, Big Predators

  • The New York Times
Saturday, December 19, 2015

Welcome to the future of urban living. Predators are turning up in cities everywhere, and living among us mostly without incident. Big, scary predators, at that. Wolves now live next door to Rome’s main airport, and around Hadrian’s Villa, just outside the city. A mountain lion roams the Hollywood Hills and has his own Facebook page. Coyotes have turned all of Chicago into their territory. Great white sharks, attracted by booming seal populations, cruise Cape Cod beaches with renewed frequency. And in a kind of urban predator twofer, a photographer in Vero Beach, Fla., recently snapped a bobcat grabbing a shark out of the surf.

Urban Coyote Research Program Response

Lead project research Dr. Stan Gehrt weighs in on the topic of urban wildlife. With so many wildlife species adapting to human dominated landscapes, this article discusses the very important question:  

Are humans equally capable of adapting?

Enjoy reading this article which highlights wildlife/human coexistence issues with cities like Mumbai being affected (though in different ways) just as cities like Chicago.

Former research associate Justin Brown, after just catching 434 for collaring

Coyote 434 is a good example of how human behaviors, such as feeding wildlife, can result in coyotes becoming a nuisance. 434 was captured on February 18, 2010, in a marsh surrounded by a subdivision and miles of urbanization. She was a young female, approximately 10 months old, and weighed 13.1 kg. Although this was the peak of the breeding season, she was not in breeding condition. A GPS collar was placed on coyote 434, which means that she was located by satellites on an intensive schedule (at times, this was every 10 minutes, other times every hour).